Raspberry Pi Configuration Tool (raspi-config)

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9. Advanced Options

This option contains a sub-menu of advanced Raspberry Pi settings.

  1. Start at the raspi-config main menu.
    Advanced Options

    Advanced Options

  2. Select Advanced Options. The Advanced Options sub-menu will be displayed.

    A1. Overscan

    This option enables or disables the black border around the screen image that can be used to correct an image that spills off the side of the display. Modern televisions and monitors do not need overscan enabled. Changes to this option will only take effect after a reboot.
    Overscan is enabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Overscan

      Advanced Options: Overscan

    2. Select Overscan. A message asking What would you like to do with overscan will be displayed.
      What would you like to do with overscan?

      What would you like to do with overscan?

    3. Select Disable to turn off overscan (default), or Enable to turn on overscan.

    Enabling this option makes the following change to /boot/config.txt:

    disable_overscan=0

    There are additional overscan adjustment settings available in the /boot/config.txt file. Use positive values if console goes off screen, and negative values if there is too much border.

    overscan_left=16
    overscan_right=16
    overscan_top=16
    overscan_bottom=16

    Disabling this option makes the following change to /boot/config.txt

    disable_overscan=1

    A2. Hostname

    This option allows you to set the visible name for this Raspberry Pi on the network.

    Please note: RFCs mandate that a hostname’s labels may contain only ASCII letters ‘a’ through ‘z’ (case-insensitive), the digits ‘0’ through ‘9’, and the hyphen.
    Hostname labels cannot begin or end with a hyphen.
    No other symbols, punctuation characters, or blank spaces are permitted.

    The default Hostname is raspberrypi.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Hostname

      Advanced Options: Hostname

    2. Select Hostname. A message showing the naming standards will be displayed.
      Hostname information

      Hostname information

    3. Select Ok. A message asking Please enter a hostname will be displayed.
      Please enter a hostname

      Please enter a hostname

    4. Enter a Hostname and press Enter.

    A3. Memory Split

    Memory on the Raspberry Pi is shared between the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). This option sets how much memory the GPU receives, with the CPU receiving the remainder.

    Model Camera Memory Minimum Maximum
    Raspberry Pi Model A/+ No 256 MB 16 MB 192 MB
    Raspberry Pi Model A/+ Yes 256 MB 128 MB 192 MB
    Raspberry Pi Model B/+ No 512 MB 16 MB 256 MB
    Raspberry Pi Model B/+ Yes 512 MB 128 MB 256 MB
    Raspberry Pi 2 Model B No 1024 MB 16 MB 256 MB
    Raspberry Pi 2 Model B Yes 1024 MB 128 MB 256 MB
    Raspberry Pi Zero N/A 512 MB 16 MB 256 MB
    Setting GPU memory to low values may automatically disable certain firmware features (as there are some things the GPU simply can’t do with too little memory). So if a certain feature you’re trying to use isn’t working, try setting a larger GPU memory split.

    The default Memory Split is 64 MB.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Memory Split

      Advanced Options: Memory Split

    2. Select Memory Split. A message asking How much memory should the GPU have? will be displayed.
      How much memory should the GPU have?

      How much memory should the GPU have?

    3. Enter a valid value (in megabytes), and press Enter.

    This option makes the following change to /boot/config.txt

    gpu_mem=64

    A4. SSH

    This option allows you to enable or disable remote command-line access to your Raspberry Pi using Secure Shell (SSH) on TCP port 22.

    Enabling SSH allows you to remotely access the command-line of the Raspberry Pi from another device on your network, without the need for a locally attached keyboard or display. Disabling SSH ensures the service does not start on boot, freeing up a small amount of processing resources. If connecting your Raspberry Pi directly to a public network, you should disable SSH unless you have setup secure passwords for all users.

    SSH is enabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: SSH

      Advanced Options: SSH

    2. Select SSH. A message asking Would you like the SSH server enabled or disabled? will be displayed.
      Would you like the SSH server enabled or disabled?

      Would you like the SSH server enabled or disabled?

    3. Select Enable to turn on the SSH server (default), or Disable to turn off the SSH server. A confirmation message stating the SSH server enabled or disabled will be displayed.
      SSH server enabled

      SSH server enabled

    4. Select Ok.

    A5. Device Tree

    This option allows you to enable or disable the Device Tree to manage resource allocation and module loading. This alleviates the problem of multiple drivers contending for system resources, and to allow HAT modules to be auto-configured.

    The main impact of using Device Tree is to change from everything on, relying on module blacklisting to manage contention, to everything off unless requested by the Device Tree Blob (DTB).

    Device Tree is enabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Device Tree

      Advanced Options: Device Tree

    2. Select Device Tree. A message asking Would you like the kernel to use Device Tree? will be displayed.
      Would you like the kernel to use Device Tree?

      Would you like the kernel to use Device Tree?

    3. Select Yes to enable Device Tree (default), or No to disable Device Tree. A confirmation message stating Device Tree is enabled or disabled will be displayed.
      Device Tree is enabled

      Device Tree is enabled

    4. Select Ok.

    A6. SPI

    This option allows you to enable or disable the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) and automatic loading of the corresponding kernel module needed to support products such as PiFace. It allows you to connect a four wire serial link to sensors, memory and peripheral devices.

    SPI is disabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: SPI

      Advanced Options: SPI

    2. Select SPI. A message asking Would you like the SPI interface to be enabled? will be displayed.
      Would you like the SPI interface to be enabled?

      Would you like the SPI interface to be enabled?

    3. Select Yes to enable SPI, or No to disable SPI (default). A confirmation message stating The SPI interface will be enabled or disabled will be displayed.
      The SPI interface will be enabled after a reboot

      The SPI interface will be enabled after a reboot

    4. Select Ok. If you chose to enable SPI, a message asking Would you like the SPI kernel module to be loaded by default? will be display.
      Would you like the SPI kernel module to be loaded by default?

      Would you like the SPI kernel module to be loaded by default?

    5. Select Yes to enable the SPI kernel module (default), or No to disable the SPI kernel module. A confirmation message stating the SPI kernel module will now/will no longer be loaded by default will be displayed.
      SPI kernel module will now be loaded by default

      SPI kernel module will now be loaded by default

    6. Select Ok.

    Enabling this option makes the following changes to /boot/config.txt

    dtparam=spi=on

    Disabling this option makes the following change to /boot/config.txt

    dtparam=spi=off

    A7. I2C

    This option allows you to enable or disable the Inter-Integrated Circuit (I2C) interface and automatic loading of the corresponding kernel module needed to support I2C devices.

    I2C is disabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: I2C

      Advanced Options: I2C

    2. Select I2C. A message asking Would you like the ARM I2C interface to be enabled? will be displayed.
      Would you like the ARM I2C interface to be enabled?

      Would you like the ARM I2C interface to be enabled?

    3. Select Yes to enable I2C, or No to disable I2C (default). A confirmation message stating The ARM I2C interface will be enabled or disabled will be displayed.
      The ARM I2C interface will be enabled after a reboot

      The ARM I2C interface will be enabled after a reboot

    4. Select Ok. If you chose to enable I2C, a message asking Would you like the I2C kernel module to be loaded by default? will be displayed.
      Would you like the I2C kernel module to be loaded by default?

      Would you like the I2C kernel module to be loaded by default?

    5. Select Yes to enable the I2C kernel module, or No to disable the SPI kernel module (default). A confirmation message stating the I2C kernel module will now/will no longer be loaded by default will be displayed.
      I2C kernel module will now be loaded by default

      I2C kernel module will now be loaded by default

    6. Select Ok.

    Enabling this option makes the following changes to /boot/config.txt

    dtparam=i2c_arm=on

    Disabling this option makes the following change to /boot/config.txt

    dtparam=i2c_arm=off

    A8. Serial

    This option allows you to enable or disable shell and kernel messages on the serial connection. Disable this option is you wish to use the serial port for your own purposes.

    Serial is enabled by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Serial

      Advanced Options: Serial

    2. Select Serial. A message asking Would you like a login shell to be accessible over serial? will be displayed.
      Would you like a login shell to be accessible over serial?

      Would you like a login shell to be accessible over serial?

    3. Select Yes to enable Serial (default), or No to disable Serial. A confirmation message stating Serial is now enabled or disabled will be displayed.
      Serial is now enabled

      Serial is now enabled

    4. Select Ok.

    A9. Audio

    The Raspberry Pi has two audio output modes: HDMI (digital) and 3.5mm ‘headphone’ jack (analogue). This option allows you to select the preferred audio output.

    Audio is set to Auto by default.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Audio

      Advanced Options: Audio

    2. Select Audio. A message asking Choose the audio output will be displayed.
      Choose the audio output

      Choose the audio output

    3. Select the desired audio output option, and press Enter.

    A0. Update

    Selecting this option will ask raspi-config to update to the latest version.

    1. Start at the Advanced Options sub-menu.
      Advanced Options: Update

      Advanced Options: Update

    2. Select Update. The screen will change to a console display while raspi-config downloads and installs any available updates. This may take several minutes to complete, at which point raspi-config will restart.

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1 comment

  1. I’m in the process of installing UniFi on a RasPi but will go to bed now (after 1AM) and finish tomorrow. Later I want to install it on an OrangePiPC if I can.
    Thanks for the info 🙂

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